Distressed Finish Tables

Distressed wood finish is a finishing process that emulates the look of antique furniture. This is a highly individualized finishing process -- each piece is unique.

We can apply this technique to all of our dining room table and kitchen table designs.

Distressed finish pricing is 15% more than a standard table. For a price quote, please contact us or see our custom table page.


Click on a Photo for a Larger Version

Geneva Dining Table, Midnight Oak, Moderately Distressed Finish

Geneva Dining Table, Midnight Oak, Moderately Distressed Finish

Geneva Dining Table, Midnight Oak, Moderately Distressed Finish

Geneva Dining Table, Midnight Oak, Moderately Distressed Finish

Additional Photos

For additional distressed wood photos, please see our photo gallery.

What is Distressing?

It seems counterintuitive to buy a brand new dining table in a distressed, or artificially aged, finish, but distressed wood furniture is making a comeback, or so say today's home furnishing experts.

The reasons are complex, they report, involving not only a backlash against the previous decade's conspicuous consumption, but also a desire to return to a simpler and more welcoming time, when slightly worn-looking furniture meant that real people lived in a house and loved every moment.

At Erik Organic, we offer you the best of both worlds; sturdy, new hardwood dining table construction with a patina of graceful aging that we achieve via a special process which leaves each piece looking like one of a kind.

Naturally, the option is yours (as the customer) to choose how much or how little distressing you want, but a typical, moderately distressed piece might feature pinholes or wormholes, which can occur in the raw lumber as a result of insect infestation, or the "rubbed" effect, where finish is worn off edges or other often-handled areas.

Additional techniques involve hammering, which gives wood a dimpled or dented appearance. These flaws are often elongated, as they would be if someone had hit the piece of wood with a non-yielding object like the edge of a dish or cooking pot.

Still others involve bleaching or pickling, particularly favored in the case of oak, where it produces a wood paler than birch much favored among flooring enthusiasts. Techniques can also include thinning paint and applying it, so that the wood shows through. This "milk painting" is typical of authentic Early American furniture that has been painted and aged for decades, as is "crackle finishing", which mimics highly aged layers of paint and/or varnish that are beginning to crack and peel.

Furniture refinishers can charge a small fortune to make your new furniture look antique. At Erik Organic, the service comes at a mere 15 percent more than the original cost of a dining table (or other piece of fine furniture), and the company's Amish artisans guarantee a piece so original it will look like it has been in your family for generations.



Sign Up!

Sign up to our monthly newsletter for updates on our furniture designs, as well as special discounts and offers.




Gail, John, Austin and Earlyn are available to help you with your questions at
888-900-5235
No pressure! Just friendly conversation!